Service of Going Too Far: L.L. Bean Puts its Boot Down

February 15th, 2018

Categories: Cheating, Retail, Rules

Some customers take advantage of businesses—we’ve all seen the type and I’ve written about this before. I have 32 posts under “cheating,” though admittedly in most cases, the swindler was a company.

Photo: firewireblog.com

An e-letter to consumers signed by L.L. Bean’s executive chairman, Shawn O. Gorman, has put the brakes on some of the nonsense. He wrote: “a small, but growing number of customers has been interpreting our guarantee well beyond its original intent. Some view it as a lifetime product replacement program, expecting refunds for heavily worn products used over many years. Others seek refunds for products that have been purchased through third parties, such as at yard sales.”

I don’t know if Brooks Brothers still has its policy but I knew a successful PR man in the day who wore a necktie for a few years and returned it, no questions asked, leaving the store with a new one. There was nothing wrong with the tie. He simply wanted a new one.

According to the new L.L. Bean policy, you’ll have one year to return an item which must be accompanied by proof of purchase. If a product is defective, they’ll work with you “to reach a fair solution.” The letter included a link to the full return policy, at llbean.com.

The letter ended: “Thank you for being a loyal customer and we look forward to continuing to inspire and enable you to Be an Outsider.”

Do you know what Gorman’s reference to “Be an Outsider” means? Do you agree with the step Mr. Gorman took? Can you blame him? Do you wonder why it has taken so long? Don’t most stores have a similar policy?

 

Service of You Can’t Give It Away: Restrictions Make it Hard to Donate Goods to Major Charities

February 12th, 2018

Categories: Charity, Donations

Friends live in two places: An oversized Manhattan studio apartment and a New England home on the top of a mountain. They often update their wardrobes so their apartment closet became overwhelmed with clothing. Fred, [not his real name], spent one Saturday in the city cleaning and reorganizing. The result: Seven 30-gallon garbage bags filled with clean, ironed shirts, jackets, slacks and sweaters, some never worn.

Fred’s hallway with bags.

Fred called, among others, the Salvation Army, Good Will Industries and Outofthecloset.org, that supports HIV research. He wanted to donate the clothing.

What he learned was an eye-opener:

  • “The Good Will store doesn’t pick up,” he wrote me. “I would have to hire a large cab and deliver the bags myself. The Good Will general pick-up online is a joke.” Note: Both friends work crazy hours and scoot to their weekend retreat to catch their respective breaths on Friday. There would be no time on weekdays for them to deliver the bags.
  • “The Salvation Army wouldn’t be able to pick up until mid March,” Fred continued. Living with bags clogging the entrance to the apartment for over a month was not an option.
  • “Outofthecloset.org won’t pick up anything less than 20 13 gallon-size plastic bags which must be filled to the top. In any case, they can’t come by for several weeks.
  • “Another organization wanted items packed in a certain kind of box and required a sticker from UPS.”

I was sad to read that Fred is “tossing good clothes in the garbage little by little because charity has such strict rules.” He added: “Beggars are choosers indeed!”

Perhaps this is only a big city issue: Average NYC apartments usually don’t have space to store giveaway items for a month or more and most people don’t have cars in town which would make drop-offs easier. [Who wants to risk getting a ticket as you load the car in front of your apartment?] In any case, Fred’s cars stay at his house or at the train station parking lot.

Have you run into such roadblocks to giving? Is the glitch because charities don’t have the volunteers they may once have had to pick up goods or that their budgets are so squeezed that they can’t afford a sufficient number of drivers and vans to do the pickups?

Service of Cooking Under Pressure: The Instant Pot

February 7th, 2018

Categories: Cooking, Gadgets, Technology

Photo: instantpot.com

The burns on my mother’s hands from an exploding pressure cooker—and going with her to the doctor who was caring for the injury–are among my earliest memories. While I love time-saving cooking appliances and gadgets, I’ve never once been tempted to go near anything that operates like that.

I was drawn to Ellen Byron’s Wall Street Journal article, “Why Is America’s Anxiety Rising? The Instant Pot,” to read what, if anything was new about this new iteration. Seems the Instant Pot does everything: steams, slow-cooks, sautés, pressure cooks and makes yogurt, rice, cakes and preserves. According to Byron, last year Amazon “delivered Instant Pots to 27,000 U.S. Zip Codes.”

Photo: successfulhomemakers.com

Byron’s title alludes to something else it does: It makes its owners nervous—for good reason– even though she said the pot comes with 10 safety mechanisms.

“Double Insight Inc., the company that makes Instant Pot, says common mishaps include overfilling the machine or releasing the pressure too quickly when cooking foods that expand,” wrote Byron. The company recommends that owners read the manual.

Her first story confirmed my apprehension: This pot is not for me. She wrote about an IT specialist who tried to clean the pot he burned while cooking spaghetti. He followed instructions to add water, put the pot on “pressure cooker high” but when he “did a quick release,” hot red sauce splashed all around from ceiling to cabinets, on him and the floor.

Photo: kittydeschanel.com

Another Instant Pot owner in Byron’s article was afraid to open the box because the gadget has so many buttons and returned the item. She eventually bought another one and went through trauma before making stew with it for the first time. She was petrified to release the pressure valve and even though nothing happened when she did, and the stew was “pretty good,” she felt “overwhelmed” and hadn’t used it again. And after all that, is “pretty good” worth all the sweat?

A retired chef who for years used a traditional pressure cooker ended up with Thai coconut shrimp bisque that “resembled cheese curds.”

There are “200 groups devoted to the device.” The largest one includes 1.2 million people in the company’s Facebook group. After yogurt boiled into the machine, another user asked her fellow groupies what to do and was advised to clean with Q-tips. Her pot works “though it smells like burned milk.”

Photo: presurecookrecipes.com

Another owner was intimidated by the manual and took a few days to recover. “There were triumphs: hard-boiled eggs, chicken, pork carnitas and chocolate cheesecake—as well as two pots of burned rice, an overcooked pork butt, a sour Key Lime cheesecake and a Christmas Day crème brûlée that looked more like a side of cottage cheese.” One said a prayer after assembling the ingredients for beef barley soup. When she “turned the quick-release valve, soup shot across her kitchen, hitting the cupboards, curtains and window.” She returned her pot.

Do you have an Instant Pot? Are you tempted to get one? Do you think the gizmo may be too good to be true? What’s wrong with pots and pans?

Photo: simplyhappyfoodie.com

Service of Both Sides of a Coin: To Sell Art or Not–the Berkshire Museum’s

February 5th, 2018

Categories: Legacy, Museums

Photo: dailykos.com

When Detroit was having its financial crisis four years ago, I shared the opinion of an economics professor who felt the Detroit Institute of Arts should sell its work by big name artists to the mega-rich and instead, opt to own the pictures of emerging talent. The new owners could lend their Picassos, Rembrandts, Gauguins and Bruegels to museums as needed and the museum would have such a huge endowment that the interest alone would pay to run the place.

Money is part of the reason the Berkshire Museum wants to sell some 40 paintings. The other is a change of focus. The sale has landed it in a legal tangle.

Photo: artnews.com

An article in ArtfixDaily, “Massachusetts AG Seeks to Extend Berkshire Museum Injunction,” reported that the “Berkshire Museum, in Pittsfield, Mass., announced in July 2017 that it would sell 40 artworks from its collections to generate about $50 million, to help fund a New Vision plan to refocus the museum on science and history, and build an endowment.”

It continued, “A November auction of the museum’s art at Sotheby’s was stopped pending legal wrangles and opposition from Rockwell’s family and others.

“‘We are hopeful that a brief extension will allow us to fully analyze the information we have received in our investigation in the hope of finding a way forward to secure the future of the Museum, and ensure it is able to thrive in the years to come,’ said Emily Snyder, a spokeswoman for Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey.”

Photo: artnews.com

Back in November, Larry Parness, the Berkshire Eagle, quoted museum directors who warned that without the proceeds of a sale, the 115 year old museum, founded by Zenas Crane, “could close within eight years” because of a yearly deficit of some $1million. “After working with a consultant, museum trustees decided to sell works from their collection and apply the proceeds to a capital project and to expand its endowment to roughly $40 million.

“The case has drawn national attention and is considered precedent-setting because it may be the largest such deaccession to date in the museum world in which proceeds would be applied in large part to operational expenses.”

The opposition, some 2,000 members of Save the Art-Save the Museum, on two Facebook pages according to Parness, raised money to pay for legal help to fight the sale and garnered 1,700 online signatures.

The museum has apparently softened its message about change-in-direction and added the word ART in a reaction to the stay by the AG. According to Adam Frenier on nepr.net “‘The museum accepts the attorney general’s request for a brief postponement, but remains eager to see these issues resolved to secure the future of the Berkshire Museum for all it provides its visitors, young and old, in art, history, and science,’ a museum spokeswoman said Monday.”

Do you think the museum directors should have kept separate any discussion of change in direction and first focused on the financial aspects of selling the art to help the museum survive or doesn’t that matter? Should the directors seek other ways of generating income before selling their legacy?

Berkshire Museum Photo: news10.com

Service of Typos That Can Hurt

February 1st, 2018

Categories: Politics, Retail, Tattoo, Technology, Typos

Photo: techslides.com

Not all typos are equal, some being more high profile than others.

In spite of best efforts I’ve made typos here since I launched the blog in 2008: Readers Lucrezia, ASK and CG can tell you as they’ve rescued me [no surprise as they were a reporter and two magazine editors, respectively]. I am super careful with the work I do for clients. I re-read my material countless times if there is time. Some clients have eagle-eyes but I’m especially careful with the copy I use for those I detect don’t pay much attention to what they approve. I’m also good at catching errors in others’ copy.

White Out for the White House

Photo: adage.com

Guests to this year’s State of the Union address received a ticket to the “State of the Uniom.” Printed by the Office of the Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper, this isn’t the first high profile typo on behalf of an administration for whom details don’t much matter.

Jason Silverstein at the New York Daily News reminded us of the Trump inauguration poster “No dream is too big, no challenge is to great…..”

Photo: thehrdigest.com

In addition to countless errors by the First Tweeter, Silverstein listed a White House public schedule which spelled the British Prime Minister’s name three times “Teresa May,” instead of Theresa May. Silverstein took delight in noting that the Teresa version is the name of a porn star. The White House Snapchat account referred to “Secretary of Educatuon Betsy DeVos” and a press release about Israel and Palestine referred to “lasting peach.”

Staff is loosey goosey about spelling names: Schaub instead of Walter Shaub; John instead of Jon Huntsman; Human instead of Humane Society; Once instead of Air Force One.

Clean Up Your Act

Photo: ragan.com

At Home Depot last Saturday I pulled over a very nice associate to confirm what I saw on a sign printed on copy paper taped to a giant pile of 8-Pack double rolls of Bounty: “was $14.97,” in small type and in giant type “now 16.97.”

We joked about it —“oh good!” I said; “I get to pay $2 more!!”—and after speaking with his supervisor on the phone to report the goof he walked me to the cashier to get me the $14.97 price because the barcode was set at the higher amount. I was there late afternoon and wonder how many hours or days the sign was there before someone noticed!

Skin in the Game

Photo: pophangover.com

According to statisticbrain.com, 14 percent of Americans—45 million—have at least one tattoo, the largest percentage falling in the 26 to 40 age range. A small one costs $45 on average and a large one, $150/hour. Annually, we spend $1,650,500,000.

The important statistics for this post are the percentage of people with tattoos who have covered up one with another–5 percent—and the 11 percent who are either getting or have already had one removed. The website doesn’t conjecture the reasons but my guess is either a girlfriend/boyfriend name change or an irritating typo.

In a skip though Google, there’s plenty of coverage of the latter. These are just a few of 38 posted in one site:

  • “Only God will juge me”
  • “You only life once”
  • “Believe Achive”
  • “My mom is my angle”

Have you made—or seen—glaring typos? Do you think that technology—auto-correct or overly complicated templates, for example—is to blame? Do you see more mistakes today than in the last 10+ years?

Photo: blog.hubspot.com

Service of Supper Clubs: Newark, N.J. Has a Winner

January 29th, 2018

Categories: Restaurant, Supper Club, Welcome

Photo: socialventurepartners.org

I’ve heard about contrived ways to meet people in a city, none of which appeal to me. One resonated in such a way that I wished I lived or worked in Newark, N.J.  Liz Leyden described it in her New York Times article, “He Was Tired of Eating Alone. 400 People Came to Supper.”

She described a supper club with a welcoming vibe. The founder did such a great job with his Brick City Supper Club, started in Newark eight years ago, that it continues to live and thrive even though he’s long left town. Far from a new concept, it’s a joy to learn about a project that works so well for all concerned.

Photo: Brick City Supper Club

Founder Frank Martinez moved to Newark from the Midwest. As the title states, he longed for eating companions so he invited colleagues from his office to eat dinner with him at a restaurant and half a dozen showed the first time. According to Leyden, he based his club on the ones around his grandparents’ Wisconsin dairy farm. Word about the weekly dinners spread well beyond the Department of Economic and Housing Development where he worked.

The club, now almost 400 strong, has an executive committee and chairman, Rob Thomas. Thomas uses Twitter to send out smoke signals about upcoming events. The team chooses the restaurants for dinners that today take place twice a month. Leyden wrote that there were 50 who gathered one cold night this month. “They were young and old, new to Newark, and born-and-raised. They work as lawyers, municipal employees, accountants, graphic artists and at least one elevator saleswoman. Most live here, others commute in for jobs and stick around for dinner.”

Photo: pixabay.com

The club meets on Mondays, because restaurants appreciate business on a traditionally slow day. They travel the city to dine at old favorites and seek out new watering holes that can use the exposure. In addition to seeing old friends and meeting new people, the members are supporting their city’s eateries. Thomas told Leyden they’ve been to some 75 restaurants over the years. One member created a spreadsheet of restaurants “so she is ready when office mates complain that there is nowhere to eat in Newark.”

Leyden wrote: “Bridges have sometimes been built beyond supper. They have eaten in one another’s homes, joined an investment club run by one member, become neighbors who borrow sugar and meet for brunch and birthdays.” One couple marveled at how welcoming to newbies the members were.

Have you been a supper club member? Do you know of successful ones? What other relaxed ways are there to meet people where you work or live?

Photo: Pennsauken.net

Service of Citizen’s Arrest

January 25th, 2018

Categories: Annoying, Audacity, Bicycles, Complaints, Courtesy, Driving, Laws, Police, Road Rage, Self Restraint, Subway, Thinking of Others, Traffic

Photo: steelturman.typepad.com

I’ve lost count of the times I’ve said out loud, sometimes to no one in particular “I wish I could make a citizen’s arrest!” When I told my husband the subject of this post he suggested I check out just what this would entail, “because,” he added, “everyone uses that expression and they may not know.”

So a quick detour before I share my targets. According to criminal.findlaw.com, in a Breaches of the Peace section: “In general, people can’t use citizen’s arrests for misdemeanors unless the misdemeanor involves a breach of the peace. Even in these circumstances, however, individuals can only make arrests when they have personally witnessed the criminal behavior and the breach has just occurred or there is a strong likelihood that the breach will continue.”

Photo: youtube

In its conclusion: “Every individual is empowered to arrest wrongdoers in certain circumstances, but individuals looking to make a citizens arrest act at their own risk. Not only is the act of apprehending a criminal inherently dangerous, but failure to meet the legal requirements for a citizens arrest could have devastating consequences for the person making the arrest.”

I trust that you don’t take me literally and that you realize I write out of exasperation. It’s helpful to let off steam once in a while in a benign way and not make life miserable for others as some of my fellow citizens are prone to do.

Photo: nyc.streetsblog.org

The most recent affront that awoke the policewoman in me was made by a delivery truck driver for a well known brand who leaned on his horn when there was nothing the vehicles in front of him could do to move out of his way. Nobody was walking in front of him; no car was cutting him off, yet he polluted the air and turned the time we all shared with him on that street into earsplitting misery.

Joining him on my hit list are the

***selfish subway passengers who won’t let me either in or out of a train

***bicyclists who miss me by a hair when they are driving in the wrong direction, zooming past me against the light or whisking past me on the sidewalk

***impatient drivers who ignore oncoming pedestrian traffic and swerve into avenue or street while endangering all those crossing an avenue

***bus drivers who use their airbrakes with abandon even when they know incoming passengers, some frail, aren’t yet holding on or settled in seats. Note: In some busses it’s quite a distance between the MetroCard fare collecting machine and strap or seat.

***drivers who won’t pull over and stop for an ambulance to pass: Don’t they realize their sister, mother, child, spouse or nephew might one day be inside?

An arrest for the following infractions would be too harsh—maybe I’d just give a warning for

***people who bump into me and don’t apologize

***elevator passengers who let the door slam in my face or who don’t offer to hit my floor when my hands are full

Are there infractions or violations to living in crowded places in a civilized way that you would hit with a citizen’s arrest or warning if you could?

Photo: dreamstime.com

Service of Meal-Kits: Less Work for Mother and Father—Or Is It?

January 22nd, 2018

Categories: Fad, Food, Time Saver

I founded Delivered Delicacies in the dark ages. I brought prepared foods and the best-of bread, pasta, desserts and more from Manhattan vendors and dropped them off at my clients’ homes and apartments in Brooklyn Heights. In the day, the Heights was a food desert.

Good idea yet there were many reasons the business failed: Too small a pool of potential customers; most didn’t share my passion for great cheese, pâté and other goodies and didn’t get the concept of topnotch prepared food. I soon learned that there was a reason that none of this was available in the neighborhood.

More than Brooklyn has dramatically changed since then: Americans everywhere increasingly appreciate first-class food. It’s no surprise that the meal-kit business has taken off. According to Heather Haddon’s Wall Street Journal article some brands are still thriving in spite of the title, “Once-Hungry Investors Pass on Meal-Kit Startups– Investors are losing their appetite for meal kits.”

A meal kit comes with fresh ingredients and recipes. You cook. An article on Buzzfeed.com in November, noted prices for three meals for two from companies that deliver nationwide ranged from around $72 for Sun Basket and Plated to around $60 for Gobble, Hello Fresh, Home Chef, Marley Spoon and Blue Apron.

Haddon wrote that in the last five years some 150 new meal-kit companies opened so “A shakeout was perhaps inevitable,” according to investors and analysts. I heard a commercial on Bloomberg Radio for Hello Fresh this weekend.

Some “still expect the sector to continue to grow as people look for easier ways to cook at home. Meal-kit sales are projected to grow to more than $6 billion in 2021 from around $2 billion in 2016, according to consultancy Pentallect LLC. Also, meal-kit companies targeting certain diets and taste preferences, such as a paleo diet, could perform well, backers say.”

Hurdles to food startups, wrote Haddon, include larger rivals and some “say meal-kit startups have lost all novelty with Amazon, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Peapod LLC, as well as supermarket chains such as Kroger Co., getting into the business. Bigger companies typically don’t depend on subscriptions and can sell meal-prep kits more cheaply.” Wal-Mart must have tracked my online research because I got an offer for their meal-kit out of the blue last week!

Another significant challenge to the meal-kit business is the expense of keeping subscribers. In a survey the negatives consumers pointed to were the expense, “the burden of having a subscription,” and delivery difficulties. One woman dropped out because too much food was going to waste; another grew bored with the concept and frustrated “with all the packaging.”

I would hesitate before investing in a finicky industry like food that is so impacted by trends, the latest being deliveries of meals from high end restaurants. Do you think meal-kits have the kind of legs one forecaster predicted, noted above, of a $6 billion industry by 2021? [though who, in three years, will remember they said this?]. Let a major thing go wrong with a bunch of meal-kits or if enough people tire of the concept, poof, the kits will go up in smoke. Have you tried a meal-kit? Would you be interested in doing so if you haven’t yet?

Service of a Happy Ending: Coogan’s Stays Open in Washington Heights

January 18th, 2018

Categories: Collaboration, David & Goliath, Neighbors, Restaurant

Photo: amazon.com

I’m a sucker for happy endings and a recent one that hit the spot is about a 33 year old Washington Heights, NY restaurant/bar, Coogan’s, that was being forced to close when its lease ran out in spring because of a $40,000 rent increase–to $60,000/month–according to harlemworldmag.com.

Photo: phillymag.com

In two days Coogan’s gathered 18,000 signatures on a petition to save the Broadway and 169th Street hangout. Under pressure the landlord, New York Presbyterian Hospital, agreed to lower the rent increase and the owners, Peter Walsh, Dave Hunt and Tess McDade, are staying put.

Before the agreement, according to cbslocal.com, Walsh told the landlord: “’There’s community here, don’t build walls. Don’t pull a plug so fast on a person when they’re still breathing.’”

Harlemworld.com reported: “During the neighborhood’s dark days of the 80s and 90s — which were plagued by drug-related violence — the restaurant remained open, owners told the Manhattan Times. ‘When we opened, we were one of the first integrated bars in New York, and maybe the country,’ Walsh told the Manhattan Times. ‘We were Dominican, African-American, Irish, Jewish, and everyone got along. We embraced the neighborhood. It worked. But thirty-three years ago, you didn’t see that kind of thing.’”

Photo: airbnb.com

“‘We have served a very, very big part of the Washington Heights community in supplying that big living room that these apartments just don’t have,’ co-owner Dave Hunt told WCBS 880’s Mike Sugerman.

“‘Now the fact that Lin-Manuel Miranda tweeted out and said everybody should get onboard, that certainly helps,’ said Hunt.” WCBS also noted “‘Hamilton’ creator Lin-Manuel Miranda celebrated his birthdays there.”

It also doesn’t hurt when in addition to hefty neighborhood support your cause is picked up by local media such as The New York Times, harlemworldmag.com, nbcnewyork.com, cbslocal.com, manhattantimes.com and patch.com/new-york for starters.

The owners are good souls—another reason so many jumped on board their cause and why the story resonated with me. Before the agreement happened, Harlemworldmag.com quoted the New York Times that the “owners are using their connections to help the 40 restaurant employees find jobs.”

There’s a flagrant contrast between the approach of this small business and the big ones that in spite of their tax windfall from the December 2017 “reform” bill are nevertheless collectively laying off millions—AT&T, Wal*Mart, Comcast, Carrier Corp. and Pfizer, to name some. Maybe we should rename “trickle down”  “riches up.”

Might this David & Goliath story be a template for supporting other worthy small fries against the greedy big ‘uns? Can you point to  instances where an aggressive collaboration by concerned citizens, backed by a celebrity and media, helped achieve a happy ending for a beloved neighborhood business?

Photo: Coogans.com

Service of Anonymity in a City: People are Watching

January 15th, 2018

Categories: Anonymity, Big, City Living, Details, Kismet

Photo: thedailystar.net

Even in a big city strangers may notice you and kismet happens.

Starch in History

I told you about the neighborhood Chinese laundry man who asked me “what happened to lots of starch?” I’d just said “no starch, please” when I’d handed him a pile of men’s shirts and I’d not been in for a year. That was long ago.

Banking Coin

Photo: youtube

There’s a Chase branch near our apartment where I dropped off what seemed like eight pounds of coins we’d collected, wrapped in penny, nickel, dime and quarter rolls. As I entered, a customer service staffer asked how she might help and I handed her the shopping bag as I wasn’t sure what she’d want me to do. I began to search for my Chase customer card as we discussed cash vs. depositing to my account and she waved the card away saying, “We haven’t seen you in a while. How are you?” I am embarrassed to say I didn’t recognize her.

Lucky Bus

A most unusual thing happened to me during the early January 2018 storm dubbed bomb cyclone due to the wind exacerbating frigid temperatures.

The storm hit Thursday. Although friends and family suggested I stay home, I wanted to pick stuff up at the office and keep my appointment at Apple repair—which I wrote about in the most recent post. I usually walk but that day was planning to take the subway to Grand Central because stretches of sidewalk weren’t yet maintained turning patches into ice rinks. Plus the wind made the cold cut through my layers.

Photo: youtube.com

On my way I saw a bus on Second Avenue and 54th Street. I was on 53rd. I started towards the bus on the slushy, icy street. The bus had already closed its doors and was moving forward. Nevertheless, the driver stopped where I stood and opened the door. I expressed my appreciation—most drivers don’t do that once they’ve cleared a stop. We chatted until I exited at 46th Street.

Two days later, the temperature still in single digits, I headed to Trader Joe’s in the 30s. My cheeks were already wind burned so I’d again planned to take a subway when I saw a bus at 2nd Avenue and 54th Street. I was stuck waiting for the light at 53rd and made a mad dash across and up the street as soon as I could although it was a lost cause as the bus was already moving south. But again, I lucked out. The driver stopped to pick me up.

I was wrapped in the same fur headband and warm scarf—a Christmas gift—and as I scrambled up the steps I heard, “You again?” It was the same driver as on Thursday! He asked: “Where are you going today? You got off at 46th Street last time.” What a memory! What a nice man.

The sad end to the story for 2nd Avenue bus customers is that last Saturday was his last day on that route. The good news for Manhattan 79, 86 and 96 Street crosstown riders is that you might meet him driving east and west.

Sometimes a city doesn’t feel like such a big place and if you are lucky, people get to know you even when you’re not paying attention. Do you have similar city stories to share?

Photo: pinterest.com

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