Archive for the ‘Humility’ Category

Service of a Humble Boss

Monday, November 26th, 2018

Photo: medium.com

 

“I made a tremendous difference in the country. This country is so much stronger now than it was when I took office that you won’t believe it. And I mean, you see it, but so much stronger that people can’t even believe it.”–DJ Trump on Thanksgiving 2018

In contrast to the quote above, my best bosses were humble and I was lucky to have had a few.

A standout was president of a major PR firm–he was my boss’s boss. He never stood on ceremony. If a phone rang on a secretary’s desk as he walked by and nobody else was around, he’d answer it. If a team was working into the night preparing a major presentation or award entry, he’d be editing, proofing, stapling and collating with the rest. Many of us would walk a plank for him.

Photo: thestatesman.com

Elizabeth Shellenbarger’s article, “The Best Bosses Are Humble Bosses,” backed up my experience. She wrote in The Wall Street Journal that while charm and charisma are sought by some corporations for their leaders, humility trumps those characteristics. [The best boss I describe above had these traits too.] Shellenbarger wrote: “In an era when hubris is rewarded on social media and in business and politics, researchers and employment experts say turning the limelight on humble people might yield better results.”

She reported: “Humble leaders can also be highly competitive and ambitious. But they tend to avoid the spotlight and give credit to their teams, Dr. Sherman says. They also ask for help and listen to feedback from others, setting an example that causes subordinates to do the same.” Ryne Sherman is chief science officer of Hogan Assessments that makes workplace personality tests.

Photo: no1blog.net

At Patagonia, a manager will ask the receptionists how a potential recruit treated them. Arrogance and/or self-absorption are usually deal killers.

“If you think you know which of your colleagues are humble, you could easily be wrong. Humble people don’t flaunt it. And many workers, including arrogant ones, try to be seen as humble and helpful to make a good impression, says Kibeom Lee, a psychology professor at the University of Calgary in Alberta.”

Humility and honesty are considered stable personality traits. The H factor, as it’s known, usually comes with other traits which Shellenbarger lists as sincerity, modesty, fairness, truthfulness and unpretentiousness. “The same people tend to avoid manipulating others, bending the rules or behaving in greedy or hypocritical ways.”

Photo: livescience.com

There are exceptions. Shellenbarger wrote: “Some challenges may call for a different leadership style. For example, employees facing extreme threats or intense time pressure might perform better when a leader takes a more authoritative, top-down approach, Dr. Owens says.” Bradley P. Owens is an associate professor of business ethics at Brigham Young University.

I’ve observed that some workers need to be nudged to perform and in certain industries, others might misinterpret humility for weakness.

Do you agree that the best bosses are humble? Have you had any who were or some who were arrogant and manipulative? Did either have any impact on your performance?

Photo: mindful.org

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