Archive for the ‘Hospitals’ Category

Service of Irritating and Charming Commercials: Phony and Legitimate Laughs

Thursday, March 15th, 2018

Photo: tripsavvy.com

It was less than a year ago that I wrote about the commercials that drove me nuts. Clearly I’ve been listening to the radio and watching TV too much as there are two more to add to the “I immediately change stations or channels as soon as I hear them” list.

This time I’ll also share some adverts I like.

Photo: davekraft.org

Fake giggles over unfunny circumstances are the worst. The prize goes to 1-800-I-Got-Junk for radio commercials in which business or homeowners laugh hysterically when the junk crew tosses out a piece of rubbish. My hands can be wet or sticky but off goes the station at the first sign of this shrill irritation and sometimes I don’t return. In looking for a link to it, which I didn’t find you’ll be relieved to know, I noticed a similar reaction to it on a website “Commercials I Hate!

 

DJ Nana. Photo: twitter.com

Speaking of laughter, I can envision the room of 30-something creative types cracking up as they developed and produced the E*Trade commercial to scare people into saving money so they have funds for their retirement. Sung to the tune of “Banana Boat Song” that Harry Belafonte made famous, it consists of 85 year olds still working and looking foolish as they drop packages they’re trying to deliver, are dragged around by a heavy fire hose, are compared to model-perfect lifeguards and “DJ Nana” spinning records while hideously dolled up. Subconsciously, it could be this ad that inspired my post earlier in the week, “Service of Aging Gracefully.” The commercial isn’t aimed at me but at 30-somethings whose Nana’s and grandpas are, I hope, spending their time making money under more appropriate, dignified circumstances.

And I love “Banana Boat Song.”

“Triathlete” Photo: NYU Langone

I also enjoy the catchy tune that NYU Langone, a well-regarded NYC hospital, uses in some of its TV commercials which make me smile. There’s a series of which “Winter” and “Athletes on their Feet” are only two. Kudos NYU Langone! [And please take good care of my friend who has not been well.]

I wish there were more State Farm “Hall of Claims” commercials as this series is clever. My first favorite is the Mer-Mutts scene where the family pooch turns on the water in the kitchen and floods the living room transformed into a swimming pool. The woof and his pals perform a water ballet while their human mom and pop look on horrified. Actor J.K. Simmons is terrific. Some other good ones are The Truck-Cicle; Frightning-bolt and Vengeful Vermin.

My bet is that the ads that aggravate sell their products like crazy and the ones I like don’t—but I’m not in advertising so what do I know? Are there ads that motivate you to change channel or station in an instant and others you don’t mind hearing and even enjoy?

Vengeful Vermin Photo: Youtube

Service of Gentle Care at the Hospital

Monday, April 18th, 2016

Doctor greeting patient 1

If you need medical attention, it’s a blessing when you’re treated kindly. It might even make you feel–if not get–better.

Big Apple

I was taking in the scene at a bustling waiting room at New York Hospital (NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center) last week. Periodically technicians or doctors stood at the door and called a name. An elderly woman got up to eventually follow a doctor down the hall and close behind was a man.

But first the doctor greeted and shook hands with both and invited the man to join them. “Oh I’m just the escort,” said the man after acknowledging that it had been two years since he last saw the doctor. I couldn’t tell if he was trying to be funny with his escort service remark when he added, “I’m her neighbor,” which didn’t clarify much. The neighbor turned to the patient and asked if she wanted him to come with her. She said “yes,” and off they went.

The patient’s comfort was the objective. The greeting wasted little time; nobody was rushed, resulting in the best, most relaxing outcome.  Anyone in the waiting room who observed this moment was charmed.

Bean Town

Faulkner Hospital

Faulkner Hospital

After an accident where she broke two fingers, a friend needed an operation and was elated at the care she received. This was at Brigham and Woman’s Faulkner Hospital in Boston, known by the locals as Faulkner Hospital. For starters, still shocked by the fall and in pain, she appreciated that the doctor’s office called her to set up the appointment and gave her the next available date at the location nearest her home. Philip E.  Blazar, M.D., her doctor, was forthright, offering to show her as much as she wanted to see/learn about the breaks and was undaunted by peripheral health issues that posed potential hurdles.

Smiling nurseShe knew precisely what to expect because the pre-op team, from surgeon and nurses to fellows, anesthesiologist and assistants, explained every step and reassured her.

Residents came to her room one at a time, introduced themselves, explained their function and confirmed that she understood what they said. The person charged with making her cast did it quickly, with concern for her mobility, and the outcome was pristine. She left after the operation with all follow-up appointments set with the surgeon and a variety of occupational therapists.

Hospital staff was polite, detail-oriented and kind. Even the cleaning crew seemed happy. On every visit, if my friend or her husband passed anyone related to the hospital in a hallway, they’d ask if they might direct them to their destination. The receptionist seemed to keep track of patients to send husbands, wives or friends, coming separately, to the right floor.

Do you agree that how you’re treated is almost as important as the skill of the people who treat you? Have you observed or experienced similar recent examples to share?

Doctor greeting patient 2

Service of Patterns: Amazon.com, The New York Times Online and Nasdaq darkened; Pleasant Hospital Staff and Apps & Privacy

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

quilt pattern

Disconnect

Within less than a month nobody could access The New York Times online or Amazon.com, for hours, and Nasdaq closed down for 180 minutes causing millions to land on starvation diets of news, shopping, reviews and research. Whatever the reasons–computer glitches or hackers–the coincidences are unsettling.

keyboardIs this a pattern and is something fishy going on?

Healing

My husband was in two emergency rooms in one week, one, Lenox Hill, in NYC and one in a rural community, Sharon Hospital, Conn.[He’s fine.] We were encouraged and delighted by the warm, professional, smart care he received by medical and support staff in both places.

smiling nursesThe entire health care/insurance industries are in a sling these days so this pattern of behavior is especially reassuring.

None of Your Business

We’ve come a long way since party lines when telephones were new, especially in rural areas, and many homes were connected to the same line. Nosey neighbors had only to pick up the phone while someone else was talking to catch some juicy tidbits. No doubt the operator who placed the calls was a town’s gossip action central.

party lineThese days it’s a lot more than the N.S.A. listening in and I get the feeling that millions have no clue what their own actions are doing to them. Health apps are among the culprits according to Consumer Bob on nbcsandiego.com. In “Health Apps May Share Personal Information: A San Diego privacy group says many of those apps are selling personal information they collect from users.” He wrote: “Collecting data on websites is nothing new. Everyone from Facebook to Google use profiles to market products and services to their users. But few people know their health and fitness apps may be doing the same thing.”

He also noted that “Many of these free applications will then sell your information to third-party advertisers.”

In the July/August issue of Dwell magazine I read about an app that for $20 stores photos and barcodes of all your furniture and appliances in case of fire or theft. There’s an option that tells you if you are adequately insured. But imagine the hacking possibilities and repercussions should this happen especially on a local level. Once you’ve collected all the information an old fashioned flash file backed by a hard copy would seem less potentially intrusive.

What do you think is going on with technology and big brands? How is it that hospitals big and small, rural and urban, have [finally] realized that a positive and pleasant atmosphere helps in healing? Are most people aware that the more they share in a digital world the more they give up their privacy?

 privacy please

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