Service of Secure Shoppers

December 1st, 2014

Categories: Art, Arts & Crafts, Craft Show, Uncategorized

NYCreates Post Card 2MB

A Michigan State University marketing study published by Psychology & Marketing reported by Henri Neuendorf in artnet showed that “men are more likely to positively evaluate an artwork based on the artist’s brand. On the other hand, whilst women also took the artists’ brand into account, they based their evaluation more heavily on the artwork itself.”

While fashion isn’t usually considered art–unless at couture level or made by hand–I know plenty of women who come off more like the men in the study. They will only buy name brands favoring easily identifiable textiles that may even feature recognizable logos. If not, and you admire what they have on, they rarely say, “Thanks,” as they are bursting to share who designed what they’re wearing. They want you to know they’ve spent plenty.

One of the ornaments in the Bird series by Jacobson & Doniger, a collaboration between husband and wife artist/illustrator Nancy Doniger and sculptor Eric Jacobson

One of the ornaments in the Bird series by Jacobson & Doniger, a collaboration between husband and wife artist/illustrator Nancy Doniger and sculptor Eric Jacobson

However if you know where to go, you can come upon treasures painted by unknown artists and remarkable crafts designed and executed by creative, talented artisans. The work you buy can achieve an electrifying impact on your interior design or wardrobe.

Here’s an example:

This weekend–December 6-7–at the Brooklyn Historical Society, NYCreates is producing its 11th annual Holiday Craft Fair. A hop and a skip from Manhattan, in Brooklyn Heights at the Brooklyn Historical Society, some 40 artisans, a photographer and artists will sell their best. NYCreates is a non-profit organization [501c3] founded in 2003 and committed to expand opportunities, visibility and marketability of NYC’s crafts artists and artisans. I’m helping to promote the fair.

Ceramist Alyssa Ettinger’s sweater-patterned porcelain salt cellar is rimmed in 24 carat gold lustre.

Ceramist Alyssa Ettinger’s sweater-patterned porcelain salt cellar is rimmed in 24 carat gold lustre.

You’ll meet ceramist Alyssa Ettinger who knows her way around interior design having pursued a career in magazine publishing for 20 years writing, editing and styling photo shoots covering home design, new products, decor and lifestyle. She threw her first pot at summer camp when she was 14 and today works exclusively in porcelain, a medium she says is “difficult and unforgiving” yet clearly worth the challenge. She describes the material as “translucent when it’s thin enough, letting light shine through.”

You might recognize the work of illustrator Nancy Doniger as it has been published in the New York Times as well as to enhance books both for children and adults. At the craft fair she is collaborating with her husband Eric Jacobsen, a sculptor, selling ornaments from their Bird collection [see photo above right]. Jacobsen creates the birds from metal and Doniger paints them. On her website she writes that her style is “bold with a quirky edge.” Doniger also draws, paints and is a printmaker.

Ceramic Egyptian figure napkin rings by Judith Eloise Hooper.

Ceramic Egyptian figure napkin rings by Judith Eloise Hooper.

NYCreates executive director Judith Eloise Hooper is also a ceramist. She describes herself as “an artist who just likes making things.” She’s been a successful fashion and children’s book illustrator and most recently has designed tabletop collections and ceramic landscapes in her Brooklyn studio. She also manages the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition gallery.

“View from Brooklyn Bridge Park,” watercolor on paper, 12” x 18,” by Alicia Degener

“View from Brooklyn Bridge Park,” watercolor on paper, 12” x 18,” by Alicia Degener

Another artist with a business brain is Brooklyn-based urban landscape artist Alicia Degener who finds the borough is a visual feast and the subject of most of her watercolors, pastels, acrylics and drawings. She co-manages this fair with Hooper. On her website, she writes that “Color and pattern work together combined with odd angles to create landscapes that juxtapose realistic and abstract elements. Strong linear elements and patterns creating movement give the landscapes a rich visual workout.”

Earrings by Bilyana Tosic Petino for Falcon Feather Jewelry.

Earrings by Bilyana Tosic Petino for Falcon Feather Jewelry.

Bilyana Tosic Petino of Falcon Feather Jewelry, attributes the style of her work to her Mediterranean upbringing. She says that her simple organic jewelry is made with a few basic materials, primarily sterling silver, soft leather cords, and semiprecious stones and makes pieces that adapt to the natural contours of a woman’s body. Her philosophy: “Jewelry should not call attention to itself or overshadow the wearer.”  

"Bird Abstractions," a photograph by Peter Houts, taken of gulls flying over The Pond in Central Park.

“Bird Abstractions,” a photograph by Peter Houts, taken of gulls flying over The Pond in Central Park.

Photographer Peter Houts chose the subject of his work because of what he said is “My love of birds which came from living on a farm in Pennsylvania for 40 years.” He continued: “Photographing these beautiful creatures became an absorbing, challenging, and rewarding hobby.” He moved to Brooklyn four years ago and joined the New York City Audubon Photography Club, meeting Johann Schumacher, an accomplished bird photographer, who used slow shutter speeds to create beautiful abstract patterns of flying birds. This is a technque Houts has perfected.

Do you care if the artisan or artist from whom you buy a gift or something for yourself represents a well known brand? Do brands matter for more than prestige? Is their value everlasting?

 

“A Painter in Their Mist,” by Janie Samuels, colored pencil, digital drawing on paper, 4 x 6 inches--11 x 14 inches, framed. The image’s line and color work both as a narrative and abstractly, giving the canvas intrinsic balance.

“A Painter in Their Mist,” by Janie Samuels, colored pencil, digital drawing on paper, 4 x 6 inches–11 x 14 inches, framed. The image’s line and color work both as a narrative and abstractly, giving the canvas intrinsic balance.

 

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6 Responses to “Service of Secure Shoppers”

  1. Lucrezia Said:

    My gift and personal purchases are made with similar criteria: Good quality and appreciation of object. In the instance of a gift, it’s wise to give the recipient his/her preferences top priority. Brands mean little in the face of quality.

  2. Jeanne Byington Said:

    I see eye to eye with you about quality first, Lucrezia,

    In Loehman’s heyday–the discount women’s fashion emporium no longer in business–I would try on something that looked awful and other women in the dressing room would encourage me to buy it because they had seen it at Saks for oodles more money. I was at the time a perfect size six and didn’t need to buy stuff that looked terrible on me. This taught me a lesson about brands: Ignore them, not what you see in the mirror.

    When I’m given a fabulous gift that is made magnificently and carries with it a well known brand I’m filled with joy and I love to wear or display it–don’t get me wrong!

    Most people can’t afford sculpture, art and craft by those whose prices start in the four figures and reach multi-millions but that doesn’t mean their homes must be without character or their jewelry and fashion accessories boxes empty.

  3. jpm Said:

    I do think men and women approach art differently. In my case, I always had an eye out for the potential appreciation in value of anything I collected, and not just its appearance. But I did not do my homework, as the attractive and well regarded is just as likely to decline in value as to rise.

    The consequences of this were disastrous, particularly with contemporary pieces, as their market values have little to do with esthetics and everything to do with marketing trends and tactics. The inexplicable, inane even gross, consequently, can often command atmospheric prices.

    Unfortunately, the “art” in the art business is more in how it is sold than in how it is made.

  4. Jeanne Byington Said:

    JPM,

    I wish I could argue with you about the art market. I can’t. The darlings of the art media and the work that people are willing to pay $millions for also grab the attention of museum curators. In the spotlight today, who knows what will happen to their value in future. Those with disposable income sufficient to buy the work don’t have to worry about value really. Only their egos are involved.

    People who buy the belongings of celebrities find that the value of their purchases often plummets once the auction frenzy is over. One example: Jacqueline Kennedy’s personal belongings.

    And collectors of anything–drawings, watercolors, photography, antique furniture, porcelain, linens, decorative accessories, 19th century needlepoint–who have investment in mind had best maintain total control over fashion trends. Otherwise, should they want to sell or should they die at the “wrong” time when their collection is out of fashion, they will lose their investment.

    When I wrote the marketing column at Art & Antiques magazine, everything Tiffany was flying off shelves at stratospheric prices. Many loyal collectors were left in the dust pushed out of the market by investors with deep pockets who bought on the advice of advisors and didn’t care what they acquired. Nor could dealers afford to replenish their stock, so who was happy? P.S. Do you read much about giant prices for Tiffany lamps and glass today?

    So it seems as though a person of moderate means should like what they buy and enjoy living with it because if they count on making headlines because the value of their purchases warrants media coverage, they might be disappointed.

  5. Martha Takayama Said:

    It is unclear how much weight to give to the Michigan State University marketing study published by Psychology & Marketing on male and female behavior in evaluating artwork. However, I certainly agree that women are all too often victims of relentless and even tasteless fashion marketing which serves primarily as a vehicle for the brand in question rather than for quality, style, creativity, elegance or good taste. The plethora of activities even in the name of art as well as fashion which generate more and more advertising of clothes that are riddled or scarred with the markings of brand letters or logos is inexhaustible. They are offered for all times of day or occasions. The female consumer in these cases can be firmly assured that her brand preference as well as her theoretical acquisitive power, though not necessarily her social standing, are clearly manifested in her appearance. Unfortunately the same cannot be said for her critical thinking, taste or independence.

    Brand identification should be a reflection of quality, taste, reliability, and durability. Fine materials and workmanship as well as flattering and tasteful design are what make fashions appealing. It is a great irony that the woman who chooses to pay a substantial amount for an item that serves as a sort of sandwich board for a designer or a fashion house is paying the extremely costly price in order to advertise the work of the subject(s) of her choice!

  6. Jeanne Byington Said:

    Martha,

    My husband doesn’t wear scent so I never realized how much men’s cologne costs these days or is it that it’s holiday buying time. I was at a great discount store in NYC and soon learned. The prices were predicated I am sure not on the perfume or what went into the bottle but on the brands on the box. So I guess men, also, fall for the “if so-and-so-is connected with it and it costs plenty it MUST be good.” I wonder how many consumers realize that the brand name on much of the extranous stuff has little to do with Ralph, Calvin and the others as they have simply sold their names on licensed product. Nose clips anyone?

    The very first time I remember reacting as you do about paying a fortune to promote someone else’s brand was eons ago when Bloomingdale’s came out with a line of women’s underpants with BLOOMINGDALE’s or BLOOMY’s or whatever it called itself at the time printed on it. Soon I saw logos on clothes like a case of chicken pox and I thought, “they should pay me to wear this stuff.”

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