Service of Healthy Frozen Desserts–But is it Ice Cream?

August 12th, 2019

Categories: Fake, Faux Food, Ice Cream

Photo: saltandstraw.com

I have tried ersatz food and have learned that if for whatever reason I cannot find the real thing, I’d rather pass. This goes for meatless burgers, diet sodas or sugarless salad dressing and cookies.

Someday I would like to be proved wrong. In the case of ice cream, my verdict about the increasingly long list of faux treats stands–based on what they sound like: No thanks.

Plant based products at Expo West 2019 Photo: vegtv.com

Anne Marie Chaker’s Wall Street Journal article, “‘There Was Something Else Ground Up in the Ice Cream,’ Children Revolt at Plant-Based Treats,” brought me up to speed on the artificial landscape for ice cream. She wrote “For ice cream lovers, it is the summer of our discontent. Eager to woo health-conscious consumers, food brands are marketing a growing range of ice cream alternatives made with ingredients such as avocado, cauliflower, beets, zucchini, oats and navy beans.”

One man in her article passed on dairy-free ice-cream [an oxymoron?] made of avocado. Other frozen treats in this category include ingredients from soy to sweet potato, pea protein to coconut.

Some dairy ice creams are supposedly healthy, promoting benefits like being “light” while including probiotics. Additional ingredients are spices or vegetables such as turmeric, cinnamon, spinach, zucchini or cauliflower. I like these vegetables and seasonings but for dinner, not in ice cream.

Chaker reported: “Ice cream must contain at least 10% milk fat for it to be labeled ice cream, according to federal regulations. Farm to Spoon bills itself as a ‘plant based frozen dessert’ while Snow Monkey pints made of banana purée and other ingredients say it is a ‘superfood ice treat.'”

I might like these frozen desserts if they tasted OK, but not as a substitute for my favorite food group. Maybe they’d work as a side to a main course. Have you tried any of these exotic concoctions? Would you seek them out? What faux or tampered with foods to make them healthy do you like? In referring to ice cream in Chaker’s article, several people used the word “fun.” Don’t vegetable-based frozen treats sound anything but fun?

Real ice cream Photo: tatecooking.com

 

 

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9 Responses to “Service of Healthy Frozen Desserts–But is it Ice Cream?”

  1. David Reich Said:

    Certain things are and should remain what they are.

  2. Jeanne Byington Said:

    David:

    Amen.

  3. ASK Said:

    FYI — the meat industry is taking on the faux-meat industry over their terminology…big article in one of the weekend sections of the Times. When is a burger not a burger? When it’s made of soy protein or some other non-meat substance. Same with steaks, chops, et. al. Rhetoric is becoming inflamed…

  4. Jeanne Byington Said:

    ASK,

    Have we all lost our taste buds?

    Meat not good for us and cows not good for the planet? Then eat smaller portions and eat it less often and the burger joints should consider selling TASTY salads like cobb and other substitutes –maybe quiche? Well made tuna salad. Salmon. But faux meat? Who are we fooling? [What do I know…they are probably selling $millions worth. To make it tasty the concoctions may be filled with other things that aren’t so great for us–who knows.]

  5. ASK Said:

    I’m not convinced that all these faux foods will save the planet…

  6. Jeanne Byington Said:

    ASK,

    I agree! We are bamboozled from every corner. The magic words are “save the environment” and “natural.” Every marketer joins the chorus. The bicycle and bicycle stand industry have done a number on NYC for example.

    Clear NYC of all the nasty motor vehicles and substitute bicycles! Take public transportation and leave your car at home! Friday I was meeting someone at Port Authority and I left one hour early. I’d planned to take the 42nd Street crosstown bus. Ha ha ha! After 40 minutes and no busses in sight on anybody’s MTA bus app I flagged a taxi and invited two women who were also waiting to join me. So much for counting on public transportation on a major crosstown artery.

    One of the women in the taxi lives in central NJ and has a new pied a terre in Manhattan. It is both cheaper and faster and more convenient for her to drive her car to the city than to take public transportation!

    So why, you may be thinking, didn’t I jump on a bicycle to go to 8th Avenue from First Avenue? Thank goodness I didn’t: The skies opened up mid-way to the terminal and I was dressed for a party and was carrying a large package. More to the point: I won’t ride a bike in NYC.

  7. Lucrezia Said:

    I am ignorant of current food fads, and rarely read labels, so I have no idea of what’s this or that based. I like to think the ingredients are harmless, and have – so far – not been poisoned!

  8. Jeanne Byington Said:

    Lucrezia,

    I didn’t even think of being poisoned–the ingredients all sound safe enough. Whether or not they are toothsome or have any connection to wonderful ice cream is another matter.

  9. Martha Takayama Said:

    I really have no desire for “faux foods”. They sound horrible. My palate revolts at the combinations. I expect ice cream to be made of dairy products, knowing that the richer although more fattening the more pleasurable it should be. And I do not like bizarre contradictory combinations that may gratify the gothic nightmares of some chef’s ego for my “ice cream desserts.” Please hold the tabasco with lavender and tumeric!
    I have had coconut chocalate ice cream because my lactose intolerant husband bought it. But then coconut is a food that is often mixed with chocolate in desserts. I have to admit I enjoyed that particular dessert, but would not deliberately buy it again. Also what about truth in nomenclautre and advertising. These non-ice “treats” in our present political and social climate evoke a kind of quintessentially Trump-style fraud and deception and suggest a horrific repulsion sounding like Nazi experiments!

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