Service of Delight in a Low Tech, Effective Invention

January 23rd, 2020

Categories: Dogs, Low Tech, Search and Rescue

Photo: deerfieldvet.com

A friend whose husband had dementia described a harrowing moment when he disappeared one afternoon on their walk home from the grocery store. Her arms were full of parcels so she wasn’t holding on to him and it started raining so she’d pulled up her hoodie, partially covering her vision. She was distracted for only a moment and when she turned around her husband was gone. That day she found him. Similar incidents happen daily to adults and children whose caretakers must call the police to help find them.

Photo: pinterest.com

“About 613,000 people were reported missing in 2018 to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Crime Information Center. About two-thirds of them were children,” reported Leslie Brody in her Wall Street Journal article, “Scent Kits Aid Tail-Wagging Detectives in Search for Missing People.” The kit is a simple tool to help bloodhounds find anyone who is lost.

Brody wrote: “Detective Christopher Nichols of Maywood’s K-9 Unit said he hopes the kits will be useful for finding people who tend to wander off, including the elderly with dementia and children with autism. It is urgent to give a search dog something with a unique scent to trace, but in some cases none can be found, he said: The missing person’s dirty socks, for example, may have been contaminated by mingling with other people’s laundry.” Maywood is in New Jersey.

Photo: anythingpawsable.com

The kit, Find ’em Scent Safe, that costs about $20, was developed by a police captain, Coby Webb, who is also treasurer of the National Police Bloodhound Association. “The kit has gloves and gauze for pressing on the user’s neck or armpit to pick up odor. The gauze goes into a plastic bag and then a small gray box that goes into the user’s freezer. In an emergency, the family can hand it to investigators. Police don’t store it.”

Brody reported that some families monitor people who tend to wander with GPS devices but that batteries could die, the wanderer could enter an area with no cell service or they might remove the device. Find ’em’s box design “helps protect it from tampering,” while dirty socks stored in the freezer can be tinkered with.

Citizens of Maywood–where Detective Nichols works–can get a free kit. “The police are promoting their offer…..at senior centers and schools for students with disabilities.”

What other simple tools like the scent kit have you heard of that can turn around a dangerous situation? Are there other preventative measures people can take to control the outcome of an emergency?

Photo: pethealthnetwork.com

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2 Responses to “Service of Delight in a Low Tech, Effective Invention”

  1. BC Said:

    Necklace or bracelet with ID info.

    You can buy a watch for the infirm and one for the caregiver. The watch on the caregiver will tell were the infirm is, by the use of a gps system. Several where I live have this system.

  2. Jeanne Byington Said:

    BC,

    Good tips. Forgot about the ID info. One of my aunts had a complicated medical history and wore such a bracelet.

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