Posts Tagged ‘DIRECTTV’

Service by an Entertainment Company that was the Opposite of Entertaining

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

Photo: supportbee.com

It’s a shame when a company produces a good product and fails so miserably in the customer service department. Our experience with DirectTV is a perfect example. We had fine TV reception for years in the boonies in upstate NY when little else electronically-related worked. When we sold our house and discontinued the service, all hell broke loose. In a nutshell, the staff was poorly trained and had access to zero customer information.

A customer service rep who took the stop-order told my husband to toss the receiver as it was too old to keep. However, he said, “hold on to the plastic card in the receiver.” He’d send a package to our city address, he said, with an envelope in which to mail back the card.

Photo: newsroom.edison.com

Having not received the package, I called and spent 20++ minutes to learn that 1) the package was sent to the wrong address 2) they couldn’t correct the address in the system and 3) they couldn’t send me a new package.

After too many minutes of nothing and being put on hold, customer service person No. 1 told me that in order to make an address change I’d have to speak with three people. As the first two conversations were useless, and after the second one promised to email a document to me to confirm our account was closed, I hung up. Further, he told me to toss the plastic card: Nobody wanted it. [I still have it.]

I never got an email.

I’m nuts about protecting my credit and wanted proof that the chapter was closed. I also wanted to cauterize future bills. As I couldn’t find a place on the website to send an email, nor could I quickly ID appropriate names in a hasty Google search, I wrote Michael White CEO. I wanted a document that said we were officially cancelled.

This week we received a bill for TV service and I called DirectTV to learn what period the bill covered. [The bill said January 15 to January 16 which was silly as we no longer owned the house and $120-something was a bit much for a day.] I spoke with two people, neither of whom could tell me. We paid the bill anyway marking the check FINAL PAYMENT. I think we owed this money and that original bill was lost in the move shuffle.

So yesterday I got an email—and my husband said several phone calls at home—from a “Sr. Manager, AT&T Office of the President.” [AT&T owns DirectTV.] Long story short, there is nothing he can do about the tossed receiver that he said we leased and should have returned. So why wasn’t this noted on our record so that the first person we spoke to about cancelling the service could advise us properly?

The Sr. Manger gave me chapter and verse about the recent bill’s breakdown. How come nobody else could?

He hoped I wouldn’t get a bill for the receiver in future and was sorry that he couldn’t do anything about that.

I replied: “We were prepared to bring the box back to the city to ship it to you and did not because of the faulty information given us. I trust that you will figure out what to do so that we never again are billed for anything from DirectTV. The TV service we had was excellent but your customer service is unacceptable.”

Today I sent him an image of both sides of our DirectTV card [Photo of one side, above left]. I think it’s amazing after a major move that we still have it!

In this digital age, how can so many disconnects happen and so many untrained customer service people be let loose on the public by a major corporation? Everything crucial about an account should be on each screen for all to access. Have you had trouble discontinuing a service and/or been consistently ill advised by customer service?

Photo: vanwiefinancial.com

Service of Not Letting Go Easily

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

Don't let go

I wasn’t going to post anything today. I had visions of everyone packing up for a long weekend. But something came up.

We’ve been using DIRECTTV to receive a television signal at our weekend place since the early 1990’s when a technician came to install a dish on the roof of our house upstate. The company has upgraded (made the service more expensive) over the years.

Recently it merged with AT&T and since then, we have been bombarded with ads touting their special “If you move take our service with you.”

Tuesday, when my husband Googled DIRECTTV to find out where to call to cancel Order cancelledour service, the only telephone number he could find on their website was the one to order the “If you move …” special. He called it and told the customer service man that we were selling our house and wanted to cancel, but were not moving to a new home and asked about next steps.

The man kept hammering away, “You must need service where you live or have a friend or relative who needs it. It would make the switch much easier for you.”

My husband explained that we live in New York City. You can’t stick dishes outside windows. Further, we don’t know anyone who needs service [nor do we have time to find someone—not our job]. All we want to do is cancel the service and move to our next chore. 

My husband asked if someone could come to the house and uninstall us and take the boxes. Someone came when we added a TV. He said he was sure that we were physically capable of doing the uninstalling and added “It would be much easier if you ordered a new service.” 

Eventually, after much haggling back and forth, he said “You’ll get a prepaid Fedex box with instructions as to what do.”

My husband asked: “What if we get electrocuted, getting your signal boxes detached?” 

He replied: “Turn the power off.”

My husband asked:  “What if we abandoned the equipment?”

He replied: “You can’t do that” and he read off a whole list of pricey penalties.

Husband: “Where can we drop off the signal boxes?”

Customer service: “You can’t, they must be FedExed to Memphis. We’ll send the shipping boxes to you in seven business days, but allow for two weeks.”

Husband: “But we will probably be out of the house by then.”

After a few more minutes of the same, my husband agreed that we would detach the DIRECTTV boxes, pack them, but not their wiring, and bring them to New York, where the company would send the prepaid FedEx boxes with the instructions as to how to detach them. Eventually, we will FedEx everything to Memphis.

My husband had the distinct impression that had we been ordering a new service somewhere else, someone would have come to uninstall us. Also, all of this hassle seems a bit silly since the equipment is so old that I can’t imagine it being of use to a soul.

The customer service rep was doing his job, trying to keep a customer, but he didn’t know when to stop even after my husband explained about restrictions to hanging dishes in NYC apartments. Further, what good to us are instructions sent after we’ve already disconnected the system?

special offersThe next day we got an email: “Give us a chance to make it right,” with special offers.

I can’t believe that we are the only customers to move to a place that doesn’t accommodate DIRECTTV and frankly, if they wanted us to be left with a good memory of them, should we subsequently move to a place with DIRECTTV as an option, they’ve lost us by complicating our lives now and making us jump through hoops to get rid of them.

This industry reflects extremes. When I returned a Time Warner Cable TV box almost two years ago, [we were changing to FIOS], nobody at the place said a word nor did they ask a question. That, too, surprised me.

Should a company train its customer service department when to stop pushing? Should they make it convenient for customers to discontinue service? Have you experienced similar inconvenience when trying to discontinue a service?

 Stop pushing

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