Service of Excuses

February 19th, 2024

Categories: Excuses, RSVP

An acquaintance went to a great deal of trouble to find the perfect place for a networking group to gather. Traditionally, not everyone RSVPs which is typical and has been this way for far too long whether to a wedding invitation or meeting of colleagues like this—but I digress.

As it happened, some dropped out at the last minute, far too close to showtime to cancel the whole thing and be sure to reach others who had planned to come.  The excuses? One said he’d partied hearty the night before and another wrote that a better opportunity had come along—though not in those words.

If you need or decide to reverse an acceptance you made to an invitation, do you:

  • tell the truth even if it’s a putdown to the others in the group
  • give no excuse or
  • make up something kind?

10 Responses to “Service of Excuses”

  1. TC Said:

    WELL NOW! I THINK WE HAVE ALL AT ONE TIME OR ANOTHER USED ALL THREE. EVEN THOUGH OUR CONSCIENCE SPEAKS ONLY FOR THE FIRST.

  2. BC Said:

    Give an excuse!

  3. Martha Takyama Said:

    I always try not to hurt, insult or offend. It is uncomfortable enough to interfere with someone’s plans and pointless to hurt them. It is inexcusable to not make a response, an excuse and or apology. Tact and diplomacy as well as consideration of others seem timeless suitable guides.

  4. Linda Levi Said:

    Linda on Facebook: I typically don’t cancel once I’ve made a commitment unless ill. But I certainly wouldn’t make something up. Always comes back to bite you and you know where!

  5. Jeanne Byington Said:

    Linda,

    I agree with you about not making something up. It’s not for goody two shoes reasons it’s because who can remember especially if cancelling has become a habit.

  6. Linda Levi Said:

    Linda on Facebook: You cite another good reason not to fib, but bottom line it’s just the wrong thing to do.

  7. Deb Wright Said:

    I almost never cancel a date or a meeting without a VERY good reason. However, I think it is good to tell the truth. Sometimes also it is okay to be kind if you are pulling out because of a personal reason that you do not want to share.

  8. Lucrezia Said:

    Excuses have a wishy-washy tone to them. Reasons are best, and if not, silence is most effective. Sounds hard-nosed? It’s meant to!

  9. Jeanne Byington Said:

    Deb,

    I once had a friend who determined an excuse for not attending something wasn’t a lie if you were protecting yourself somehow. I wonder if her advice is related to the one you mention–a reason you don’t care to share.

  10. Jeanne Byington Said:

    Lucrezia,

    Reasons are best unless they could hurt the organizer or host’s feelings as in “I’m not really in the mood,” or “I decided to wash my hair instead.”

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