Posts Tagged ‘Peloton’

Service of Due Diligence

Monday, December 13th, 2021


Image by aerngaoey from Pixabay 

It pays to ask questions or do a modicum of research which some marketers have learned the hard way. According to businessinsider.com, in the 1990s Yardley hadn’t asked actor Helena Bonham Carter about her makeup routine before they announced their relationship with her. After she publicly admitted she didn’t wear makeup and couldn’t fathom why they chose her, they cut their association that shouldn’t have happened in the first place.


Image by Hannah Wesolowski from Pixabay 

In 1989 PepsiCo staff needed only look at Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” music video to determine that it didn’t reflect the image they sought. Yet they paid her $5million to appear in benign commercials which included the then new song. “While the ad itself was PG,” reported Laura Stampler, “Madonna’s music video for the song in which she witnesses a rape and gyrates around a burning cross incited an explosion of controversy.” Would checking that have been so hard to do?

And what about recently? In the “Sex and the City” reboot, “And Just Like That…” on HBO Max that premiered last week, a main character, Mr. Big, dies after a 45 minute Peloton class on a Peloton stationary bike–a super product placement gone south. The company didn’t pay for the placement but knew their equipment was being used, reported Joseph Pisani and Megan Graham in The Wall Street Journal. It also approved a Peloton instructor, Jess King, appear in the segment.

Did anyone at Peloton ask enough questions or demand answers before playing ball? “While Peloton coordinated with HBO on the placement of one of its bikes, HBO didn’t disclose the plot in advance because of ‘confidentiality reasons,’ Peloton said.” Lesson learned to leave nothing to trust in future?

Peloton spokespeople put a good face on it. “’Mr. Big lived what many would call an extravagant lifestyle—including cocktails, cigars, and big steaks—and was at serious risk,’ said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, a cardiologist on Peloton’s health and wellness advisory council, in a statement from the company.” The reporters ended the article: “Peloton said there is some good news: ‘Riding his Peloton bike may have even helped delay his cardiac event,’ Dr. Steinbaum said.”

It’s not only in business we need to ask questions and insist on answers. The husband of a friend swallowed pills that killed him. He didn’t check the product insert and counted on his doctor to remember his health history that contraindicated the drug.

Are you good at asking questions? Do you know of other examples in which a well known company missed the boat due to lack of research? Are there any elements in our lives that we can leave to trust?


Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay 

Service of Best Intentions: Makeup and Exercise

Thursday, October 7th, 2021



Image by fotostrobi from Pixabay

I know about best intentions. I buy makeup and with the exception of the most mundane face cream, base or lipstick, I soon lose interest and abandon it.

With the exception of walking, the only time I’ve exercised on my own has been to support the regimes physical therapists recommended after I broke my foot and to fix a shoulder issue. I’m ashamed. My father exercised daily. During the worst of the pandemic I walked for miles in my space-challenged apartment while speaking on the phone but most wouldn’t consider that exercise.

I admire those who buy exercise equipment. For me it would  become a place to hang a shirt worn for an hour or a sweater I was too lazy to fold and put away or maybe even an expensive device on which to air dry laundry.


Image by Sendoku from Pixabay   

Jen Murphy wrote “Pandemic’s Peloton Obsession Turns to Peloton Fatigue At-home workouts grew into a cultural phenomenon during lockdowns, but the easing of restrictions has even die-hards idling exercise bikes for fun outside.” She reported in The Wall Street Journal article “The web-connected exercise bikes from Peloton Interactive Inc. start at $1,495 with the option to pay $39 a month for live-stream and recorded workouts.” At the height of the pandemic the recorded workouts made participants feel connected with others; some compared participating to attending a party.

“The pandemic has since shifted to a new stage,” Murphy wrote. “For some people, the easing of Covid-19 restrictions has prompted a break from their Peloton obsession and the pursuit of different physical activities. Others say they are too drained from the pandemic’s grind to muster any energy to hop on a bike.”

Peloton spokesperson Amelise Lane “attributed the decline in average monthly workouts per user to summer weather, which drew more people outdoors. Many Peloton users are spending more free time at the gym, dining out or taking vacations, she said.”

Murphy continued: “Other people say that getting back to social activities has left them too tired to maintain their peak levels of Peloton workouts.”

I’m considering a tryout with a yoga for beginners video I saw on YouTube [the operative word: considering]. Are there categories of things about which you have the best intentions but you discover or recognize your limits? Have you overridden any? Do you follow an exercise regimen with or without equipment?


Image by Wokandapix from Pixabay   
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